Hidden Cameras And Ethics

Hidden spy cameras are a great way to find out if your nanny is abusing your kids or if the caretaker your hired for your elderly parents is mistreating them, but hidden cameras are also a good way to land in jail if you aren’t careful. TV news stations use hidden cameras for large expose cases and police surveillance teams use them to catch the bad guys. But whenever a spy camera is used, there are ethical questions that need to be asked.

The Legal Aspect

A majority of video recordings in America are legal whether or not the people being filmed gave their consent or not. If you’re thinking about using hidden cameras or security cameras, then you should familiarize yourself with laws that pertain to invasion of privacy, which touches on the idea of expected privacy. Places where a level of privacy is expected include locker rooms, dressing rooms, bathrooms and bedrooms. Even though one of the most popular uses of hidden cameras is to keep an eye on nannies and babysitters, there are advocacy groups for nannies that feel that recording a nanny without their consent is an invasion of their privacy and that doing so infringes on the relationship between parent and child care providers. Others feel that whenever a nanny decides to enter someone’s home they essentially give up their right to privacy. So which side is right and which is wrong?

Investigative Reporting and Police Surveillance

Both local and national TV news networks have been using hidden spy cameras for years to expose nursing home abuse, government fraud, racial discrimination, compromised airport security and more. Since the use of hidden cameras is deceptive, some feel that they should only be used as a measure of last resort when all other alternatives have been ruled out, such as interviewing and looking over documents and databases. While hidden cameras have documented major violations of human and civil rights, they’ve also been used for small scale consumer problems that don’t really justify the use of a hidden camera.

Those in favor of police surveillance justify its use by saying that there are terrorists and criminals out there who can be caught with the use of hidden surveillance. Millions of dollars have been contributed to setting up more surveillance cameras in cities across the nation. Those who support privacy feel that police surveillance is violating privacy rights and is actually failing to curb crime. Their reason for saying so is that people don’t feel as free since something as simple as going to a doctor’s office, walking in the park or attending a rally will be permanently documented and can be pulled up by the authorities whenever they wish.

In any case, if you’re thinking about using a hidden camera to see if your spouse is cheating, to see if your nanny is abusing your children or even for home security, it’s a good idea to consult a licensed and experienced legal adviser who specializes in privacy laws just to make sure that you won’t be breaking any laws or violating anyone’s right to privacy. It’s better to learn about these things before you’re standing in front of a judge or hit with a serious lawsuit.

Author bio: This article was provided by Paul of brickhousesecurity.com, the premier website to go for more information on spy camera glasses technology

 

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